Line | Einat Amir and Guy Yitzhaki, 2011

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Curators: Sala-manca

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The living room is wall-papered with drawings. A projection
onto the drawings creates a hybrid image. In the space
between the projection and the drawing, strings diverge and
converge, transforming into a three-dimensional image that
changes with the projection. Elsewhere, on the living-room
floor, a projected drawing is thickened by drops of water.
The scenery changes as in a nighttime stroll through the
forest out of a Japanese animated film.
In the library, a book of sketches by Einat and Guy converses
with Illuminated Manuscripts by David Small. As the
spectator browses through the book, the drawings projected
onto it change. They are like memories of digital sketches
from a different place—a combination of the manual craft
and the digital craft. The exhibit is rounded out by Einat’s
drawings, hung in the living-room of the house.
The joint exhibition, Line, was commissioned by Mamuta in
order to bring to fruition the potential of dialogue between
the two artists, which began about two years ago when they
began their residencies in the Center’s shared studio space, and continued with various projects (see the interview with Jan Tichy). It was a successful realization of Mamuta’s choice not to place walls between the studio spaces. Their dialogue
stemmed from Einat’s curiosity about new media and from her desire to penetrate the world of programming and the projected image, which is Guy’s artistic world. Einat feels that with these media she will be able to deepen the investigation of the dimension of time in her own work. For his part, Guy believes that the encounter with the materiality of Einat’s works can broaden his own experimental style—
which entails the creation and projection of images through algorithms that react to physical structures. Their collaboration creates a unique language, combining
two different semiotic systems—that of drawing, craft, and text, and that of the digital image. Thanks to its precision, the connection is fascinating, poetic, and challenging.
The exhibit is the culmination of a year and a half of work at Mamuta, in which the two artists began to develop their common language. Line is the first closing of a circle. This  point is only a beginning.
Lea and Diego (Sala-Manca group)